Explained: Why Bhutan Should Remember Chinese Five Fingers of Tibet Policy?

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The Chinese Five Fingers of Tibet policy is not a threat to India only, but also a survival alarm for Nepal and Bhutan ,and in case both the Himalayan countries failed to anticipate this Chinese move then sooner or later both have to face consequences of the same.

Chandigarh (ABC Live): India rejected a Chinese move to rename of places situated in Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh today.

It is to remind that China’s move of renaming places in Arunachal Pradesh is part of Chinese the Five Fingers of Tibet policy which aims to kill two birds with one stone, first it will help in Sinicization of Tibet, and secondly it may put psychological pressure on India without any taking any militarily action in Arunachal Pradesh for its geostrategic importance.

The Five Fingers of Tibet is a Chinese foreign policy idealized by Mao Zedong considers Tibet as China's right hand palm, with five fingers namely Ladakh, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan, and Arunachal Pradesh, that it is China's responsibility to "liberate" these five fingers.

It is on records that China never discussed Five Fingers of Tibet policy in official statements, but concerns have been raised over its possible continued existence or revival. An article published in mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist Party verified the existence of this policy in the aftermath of the 2017 China–India border standoff.

Background of the Five Fingers of Tibet policy

Imperial China claimed suzerainty over Nepal, Sikkim, and Bhutan as an extension of its claim over Tibet. These claims were asserted by the Chinese amban in Tibet in 1908, who wrote to the Nepalese authorities that Nepal and Tibet, "being united like brothers under the auspices of China, should work in harmony for mutual good." He suggested the "blending of five colours" representing China, Tibet, Nepal, Sikkim, and Bhutan as part of his program to assert the Chinese claim in the face of British opposition.

On 15 November 1939, the founding chairman of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), Mao Zedong termed Bhutan and Nepal as China's tributary states. After having inflicted military defeats on China, the imperialist countries forcibly took from her a large number of states tributary to China, as well as a part of her own territory. Japan appropriated Korea, Taiwan, the Ryukyu Islands, the Pescadores, and Port Arthur; England took Burma, Bhutan, Nepal, and Hongkong; France seized Annam; even a miserable little country like Portugal took Macao from us. At the same time that they took away part of her territory, the imperialists obliged China to pay enormous indemnities. Thus heavy blows were struck against the vast feudal empire of China.

Know what is China’s the Five Fingers of Tibet policy

According to Five Fingers of Tibet policy, China considered Tibet as it’s the palm of right hand and Ladakh, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan, and Arunachal Pradesh as its five fingers which were wrongfully being held by the Indian imperialists.

In 1954, the Chinese government published a book called "A Brief History of Modern China" for school students, which included a map showing the territories allegedly taken by "imperialist powers" between 1840 and 1919, terming them as "portions of China that must be reclaimed." This map included Ladakh, Nepal, Bhutan, Sikkim, and the entire Northeast India.

The Chinese Five Fingers of Tibet policy is not a threat to India only, but also a survival alarm for Nepal and Bhutan ,and in case both the Himalayan countries failed to anticipate this Chinese move then sooner or later both have to face consequences of the same.

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