Explained: How India Will Provide Food To Half of World Population By 2030

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The meaning thereby that India which a largest exporter of rice worldwide hold key to provide the fundamental food to about half of the world’s population in years to come as the rice deficit in Africa is 4.76 million tons at present, but it will reach 17.63 million tons by 2030; 94% (16.58 million tons) of that deficit will be filled by Asian imports.

New Delhi (ABC Live India): There are media reports that the European Commission Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF)  withdrawn the 500 tonnes of genetically modified rice exported from India after the clearance of India’s The Genetic Engineering Appraisal Committee (GEAC).

The English daily The Hindu reported that, “When candy giant Mars Wrigley carried out a mass recall of several batches of its Crispy M&Ms across Europe this August, it was due to the use of one ingredient: rice flour with genetically modified (GM) contamination that allegedly originated in India, according to notifications on the European Commission’s rapid alert system.”.

The Ministry of Commerce & Industry on October 20, 2021 issued a press release which says as under; “It may be clarified that there is no commercial variety of GM rice in India, in fact the commercial GM cultivation of rice is banned in India. There is no question of export of GM rice from India. A particular incident which is reported through Rapid Alert by EU, the GMO contamination is suspected to have been found in the rice flour which was processed in EU and they themselves are not sure of the exact source of contaminant. The broken white rice exported from India which is allegedly one of the possibilities has passed through many hands before reaching to the actual processors in EU.

 There is always a possibility of mixing or cross contamination at every stage. The exporter however, has confirmed that the rice exported was Non GMO and there is hardly any possibility of cross contamination even during inland transit as the final sample was drawn at the port of loading by an independent inspection agency having the International recognition who after due to testing and verification issued Non GMO certificate before shipment. The cross contamination if any, could be possible while processing of the broken rice into final products.

 Since, there is no commercial variety of GM in India, proper testing was also done before shipment of the consignment. The possibility of GMO contamination due to white rice exported by India is not possible.

India is exporting strictly Non GMO rice to World.

As reported in the same news item this could be the conspiracy to malign the image of India as a reliable supplier of quality rice to the world. The experts in India both from Genetic Engineering Appraisal Committee (GEAC) and Agricultural experts from IARI and other rice experts in India are however, investigating the matter but re-confirming that commercial GM variety of rice is not grown in India.”

The ABC Research reported that the top 5 rice exporting countries (India, Thailand, Pakistan, United States, and Vietnam) account for 71.4% of the total value for the internationally exported cereal.

RANK

EXPORTER

2020 RICE EXPORTS

2019-20

1.

India

$7,980,028,000

+17.3%

2.

Thailand

$3,688,850,000

-12.3%

3.

Pakistan

$2,101,268,000

-7.7%

4.

United States

$1,888,783,000

+0.6%

5.

Vietnam

$1,822,898,000

-25.1%

6.

China

$916,643,000

-13.4%








A research titled the Future of Rice Production and Consumption says, "Rice is the fundamental principal food for about half of the world’s population, and it supplies 20% of the calories consumed worldwide. Rice consumption increases with population. In the 21st century, a large increase in population is anticipated. Most of the increase will occur in Asia and Africa, where the population lives on rice. The food problem will become as important as the environmental problem. We present basic data for thinking about the food problem in the future."

The meaning thereby that India which a largest exporter of rice worldwide hold key to provide the fundamental food to about half of the world’s population in years to come, and should not come under pressure of vested west based multinationals companies, like which presently hold the basic food, and food supplements markets as this allegation can malign the image of India as a reliable supplier of quality rice to the world.

The rice deficit in Africa is 4.76 million tons at present, but it will reach 17.63 million tons by 2030; 94% (16.58 million tons) of that deficit will be filled by Asian imports, requiring 40 ships (60,000 DWT carriers). Another 6% (1.05 million tons) will come from the Americas, requiring two ships. World population will increase to 8.27 billion people in 2030. Whether or not we can ensure enough rice for the increasing population will depend on rice production in Asia. Rice production exceeds consumption in Asia and the Americas, both of which will continue to be exporting areas.

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