Explained: Why India Should Act and Invest in Space Power?

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It is pertinent to mention that the union budget for 2023-24 allocated Rs 12,544 crore for the various government space activities, which is 8% less compared to the amount earmarked in the previous budget (2022-23) whereas China outspent every country in the world in 2020, except for the United States. However, Beijing’s $8.9 billion in space funding was a fraction of the US’ $48 billion.

Chandigarh (ABC Live): The Space power is all set to be on urgent agenda of geopolitical agenda sooner or later therefore all nations aspiring to find prominent space in coming year’s geo dynamics have to plan and accordingly.  

The current geopolitical tilt towards Asian region gives India opportunities to claim the position it deserves, but Indian policymakers must also exercise 360-degree critical thinking and make sure their foreign policies are feasible for each individual nation and circumstance, based on accurate and trustworthy information and data.

On April 7, 2023, Union government has approved the Indian Space Policy 2023 aims to boost the country's space department's role and give a larger participation to research, academia, startups, and industry.

The policy lays down the roles and responsibilities of organizations such as the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), and private sector entities.

It is pertinent to mention that the union budget for 2023-24 allocated Rs 12,544 crore for the various government space activities, which is 8% less compared to the amount earmarked in the previous budget (2022-23) whereas China outspent every country in the world in 2020, except for the United States. However, Beijing’s $8.9 billion in space funding was a fraction of the US’ $48 billion.

The ABC Research team working on China–India relations refers an article written by Namrata Goswami first published on Lowy Institute and republished in the interest of transparency in geopolitical affairs  

The Article says as under;

China’s 2021 white paper on space clearly defines President Xi Jinping’s dream of turning China into a first-rate space power. As part of the plan, China has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Russia to establish a research station on the Moon within the next two decades. India has not articulated any such grand designs. Neither has India developed a national plan for assuming leadership in AI, quantum communications or SBSP. While India recognises that these areas will play a critical role in the global space economy – with the country aiming to increase its share of the US$420 billion field from two percent to nine per cent by 2030 – its ambitions pale in comparison to China’s lead space scientists who have articulated aspirations of an annual US$10 trillion Earth-Moon economy by 2050.

In China’s rise, space is playing an integral role based on strategic decisions made in the early 1990s. These included to shift the space curve from national development goals and space capacity for informational purposes, to developing policy to source energy and material growth. India has recently developed institutions to support its own national security and commercial space sectors, but its path continues to be determined by traditional space launch goals. Critically, India will not publish a white paper on its space policy and goals for the next five years, thereby ceding space to China, who is all too keen to control the narrative of space leadership in Asia and the world.

To Read complete article written by Namrata Goswami click here

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