Explained Why Food Security and Agriculture Should Be on High Agenda of G20?

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The G20 plays an important role in the development of this global action, as its members represent about 60 percent of all agricultural land and about 80 percent of world trade in food and agricultural products.

Chandigarh (ABC Live): The ongoing 2nd Agriculture Working Group meeting of G20 in Chandigarh is in its second Day.

After informal engagements on 29/03/2023, today we expect serious work on Agriculture from deputies our Young and energetic Editor, Karan Dinesh Singh Rawat is covering the Chandigarh G20 meeting on behalf of ABC Agriculture Research Team.

Agriculture is one of crucial aspects of Geopolitics as food security always remains on top priority of all the international organizations like UN, World Bank, WHO, WTO, IMF etc.

The G20 plays an important role in the development of this global action, as its members represent about 60 percent of all agricultural land and about 80 percent of world trade in food and agricultural products.

The G20 in its first meeting, the Pittsburgh Summit held September 24 – 25, 2009 declared on Food Security  that, “we call on the World Bank to develop a new trust fund to support the new Food Security Initiative for low-income countries announced last summer. We will increase, on a voluntary basis, funding for programs to bring clean affordable energy to the poorest, such as the Scaling Up Renewable Energy Program.”

Further G20 leaders in Pittsburgh Summit in their released declaration on Agriculture said, “39. Sustained funding and targeted investments are urgently needed to improve long-term food security. We welcome and support the food security initiative announced inL’Aquila and efforts to further implement the Global Partnership for Agriculture and Food Security and to address excessive price volatility. We call on the World Bank to work with interested donors and organizations to develop a multilateral trust fund to scale-up agricultural assistance to low-income countries. This will help support innovative bilateral and multilateral efforts to improve global nutrition and build sustainable agricultural systems, including programs like those developed through the Comprehensive African Agricultural Development Program (CAADP). It should be designed to ensure country ownership and rapid disbursement of funds, fully respecting the aid effectiveness principles agreed in Accra, and facilitate the participation of private foundations, businesses, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in this historic effort. These efforts should complement the UN Comprehensive Framework for Agriculture. We ask the World Bank, the African Development Bank, UN, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), World Food Programme (WFP) and other stakeholders to coordinate their efforts, including through country-led mechanisms, in order to complement and reinforce other existing multilateral and bilateral efforts to tackle food insecurity.

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